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At the end of the last Apollo 15 moon walk, Commander David Scott (pictured above) performed a live demonstration for the television cameras. He held out a geologic hammer and a feather and dropped them at the same time. Because they were essentially in a vacuum, there was no air resistance and the feather fell at the same rate as the hammer, as Galileo had concluded hundreds of years before - all objects released together fall at the same rate regardless of mass.

The above is a statue of Atlas holding the Sky on his shoulders - NOT the Earth as is commonly believed.
In Greek Mythology, Atlas is a Titan who was forced to carry the Sky on his shoulders after being on the losing side of the Titanomachy - The war between the Gods and the Titans. His duty was to separate the Sky (his grandfather, Uranus) and the Earth (His grandmother,  Gaea).
This is because the intermingling of Gaea and Uranus led to the creation of both the Titans and the Giants (2 of  the greatest enemies of the Olympian gods).
His most famous story involves his encounter with Heracles.  Heracles was tasked with retrieving some of the golden apples from from Hera’s garden. The problem is that it was guarded by the vicious dragon, Ladon.  So Heracles went to Atlas, whose daughters tended the garden, and offered to temporarily hold up the heavens while Atlas got the apples from his daughters.
When Atlas returned, he tried to trick Heracles into carrying the sky permanently by offering to deliver the apples himself (because anyone who purposely took the burden must carry it forever, or until someone else took it away). Heracles distrusted him, but pretended to agree.  He merely requested Atlas take the sky again for a few minutes so Heracles could rearrange his cloak as padding on his shoulders. When Atlas set down the apples and shouldered the heavens again, Heracles grabbed the apples and fled.

The above is a statue of Atlas holding the Sky on his shoulders - NOT the Earth as is commonly believed.

In Greek Mythology, Atlas is a Titan who was forced to carry the Sky on his shoulders after being on the losing side of the Titanomachy - The war between the Gods and the Titans. His duty was to separate the Sky (his grandfather, Uranus) and the Earth (His grandmother,  Gaea).

This is because the intermingling of Gaea and Uranus led to the creation of both the Titans and the Giants (2 of  the greatest enemies of the Olympian gods).

His most famous story involves his encounter with Heracles.  Heracles was tasked with retrieving some of the golden apples from from Hera’s garden. The problem is that it was guarded by the vicious dragon, Ladon.  So Heracles went to Atlas, whose daughters tended the garden, and offered to temporarily hold up the heavens while Atlas got the apples from his daughters.

When Atlas returned, he tried to trick Heracles into carrying the sky permanently by offering to deliver the apples himself (because anyone who purposely took the burden must carry it forever, or until someone else took it away). Heracles distrusted him, but pretended to agree.  He merely requested Atlas take the sky again for a few minutes so Heracles could rearrange his cloak as padding on his shoulders. When Atlas set down the apples and shouldered the heavens again, Heracles grabbed the apples and fled.